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Vision Development Through Edina’s Eyes – Lynn Hellerstein https://lynnhellerstein.com Colorado Optometrist, Author of See It Say It Do It, Vision Therapy and Visual Processing Mon, 04 Feb 2019 21:33:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 EYE HEALTH CARE IS ESSENTIAL AND NOW IT’S COVERED FOR CHILDREN https://lynnhellerstein.com/eye-health-care-is-essential-and-now-its-covered-for-children/ https://lynnhellerstein.com/eye-health-care-is-essential-and-now-its-covered-for-children/#respond Sat, 01 Feb 2014 15:09:31 +0000 https://lynnhellerstein.com/?p=7296 Comprehensive pediatric vision is one of 10 essential benefits authorized by the ACA as a required benefit for all health plans sold in the new state-based health insurance marketplaces .

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The Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA) provides children with health
insurance coverage that includes direct access to their local eye doctor for a
comprehensive eye examination, follow-up care, treatment, and, if needed,
eyeglasses or contact lenses. Comprehensive pediatric vision is one of 10
essential benefits authorized by the ACA as a required benefit for all health
plans sold in the new state-based health insurance marketplaces
(exchanges) and many plans outside the marketplaces.

Read the rest of the article Childrens-Eye-Vision-Care-Fact-sheet

Pediatric Eye Exam by Dr. Lynn Hellerstein

Pediatric Eye Exam by Dr. Lynn Hellerstein

 

Read more and watch videos/pictures about vision development here.

By Dr. Lynn Hellerstein, Colorado Pediatric Optometrist in Vision Therapy

 

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Vision Development…Through Edina’s Eyes Part VII https://lynnhellerstein.com/vision-development-through-edinas-eyes-part-vii/ https://lynnhellerstein.com/vision-development-through-edinas-eyes-part-vii/#respond Wed, 09 Oct 2013 21:27:16 +0000 https://lynnhellerstein.com/?p=7050 Happy birthday!  Edina is 3 years old…going to pre-school! It is now three years since my beautiful grand-daughter, Edina Rose was born on September 14, 2010. Edina has given me an opportunity to not only spoil her, but to also observe her from a different perspective. When I had my own kids 30+ years ago, […]

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Happy birthday!  Edina is 3 years old…going to pre-school!

It is now three years since my beautiful grand-daughter, Edina Rose was born on September 14, 2010. Edina has given me an opportunity to not only spoil her, but to also observe her from a different perspective. When I had my own kids 30+ years ago, I, too, read the child development books. I was always trying to make sure that I was giving them the best opportunities for good health, learning and success. My two daughters have grown up to be very bright, beautiful and loving adults…I am blessed.

The demands of being a parent are tremendous; great excitement tempered with fatigue, time management challenges and basic survival! Being a grandmother and a developmental optometrist, still allows me to watch little Edina grow and develop, but without all the demands of being the parent. With my passion and interest in helping children with learning, I am, of course, closely monitoring her development.

As pre-schoolers, it is important for them to continue development of eye/hand/body coordination, eye teaming, and depth perception. Your child should have already received his first vision assessment from a developmental optometrist, it’s now time for his 2nd vision evaluation.

Remember, sending kids to school with vision problems is like going to work without the primary resources that you need for your job. Developmental visual skills are an essential part of school readiness.

Click here to review previous posts on Vision Development through Edina’s Eyes.


By the end of 3 years, many children are able to:

Social/Emotional

  • Copy/mimic adults and friends actions
  • Show concern for crying friend
  • Show a wide range of emotions
  • Separate easily from mom and dad
  • May get upset with major changes in routine
  • Dress and undress self

Language

  • Follow instructions with 2 or 3 steps
  • Name most familiar things
  • Understand words like “in,” “on,” and “under”
  • Say first name, age, and sex
  • Name a friend
  • Say words like “I,” “me,” “we,” and “you” and some plurals (cars, dogs, cats)
  • Talk well enough for strangers to understand most of the time
  • Carry on a conversation using 2 to 3 sentences

Cognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving)

  • Work toys with buttons, levers, and moving parts
  • Play make-believe with dolls, animals, and people
  • Do puzzles with 3 or 4 pieces
  • Turn book pages one at a time
  • Build towers of more than 6 blocks
  • Screw and unscrew jar lids or turns door handle

Movement/Physical Development

  • Climb well
  • Run easily
  • Pedal a tricycle (3-wheel bike)
  • Walk up and down stairs, one foot on each step

Visual Skills

  • Have good tracking skills
  • Judge distances more accurately when throwing objects (look out!)
  • Look intently at a book as you read to the child
  • Recognize people in photos
  • Locate  specific pictures in books

Visual Concerns

  • Misalignment of the eyes (called strabismus) should not be present after 4-6 months.
  • Your child does not seem interested in looking at objects or people
  • Extreme sensitivity to lights
  • Excessive tearing
  • Red or encrusted eye lids
  • Lack of visual attention
  • Decreased movement or motor development

Act early by talking to your child’s doctor if your child:

  • Falls down a lot or has trouble with stairs
  • Drools or has very unclear speech
  • Can’t work simple toys (such as peg boards, simple puzzles, turning handle)
  • Doesn’t speak in sentences
  • Doesn’t understand simple instructions
  • Doesn’t play pretend or make-believe
  • Doesn’t want to play with other children or with toys
  • Doesn’t make eye contact
  • Loses skills he once had

If you notice any of the concerns stated above, take your baby in for a professional eye examination from a developmental optometrist or ophthalmologist.  Also discuss your concerns with your pediatrician or family doctor.

Way’s to encourage development

  • Provide plenty of playtime, including playing alone, with peers and with their parents
  • Use building blocks, puzzles and balls of all shapes and sizes to play with to boost fine motor skills
  • Read or tell stories to stimulate your child’s ability to visualize and pave the way for learning and reading
  • Listen to music and play with musical toys
  • Provide tools for drawing, cutting and other artistic activities (crayons, markers, safe scissors, paint, clay, etc.)
  • Get your child outside as much as possible–even in the colder weather.  Well-chosen outdoor play games can provide for plenty of fun, exploration, education as well as physical development.
  • With all the electronic media available (computers, tablets, TV, movies, etc.), electronic input for children of this age should be limited to no more than 2 hours per day (including educational programs).

Some of the information was obtained on http://www.cdc.gov

Remember, I don’t want any parents worrying about their baby because of certain developmental “cut-off” dates. Development does not always progress in a smooth manner. All children develop at their own rate. Ask your doctor or nurse if you have concerns with the development or health of your baby.

Vision Development Through Edina's EyesI am blessed to be a part of my child’s and grandchild’s life. There is just no way to describe the love, fun and beautiful experiences that children bring to my life.

In the next several e-newsletters, academic and sports activities will be presented. Stay tuned for more! Please send me your comments and ideas for future topics!

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Clear Speech Blog https://lynnhellerstein.com/clear-speech-blog/ https://lynnhellerstein.com/clear-speech-blog/#respond Tue, 25 Dec 2012 14:26:24 +0000 https://lynnhellerstein.com/?p=4013 Many thanks to Clear Speech, Inc., a pediatric speech, language, and feeding clinic in Everett, WA.  They featured my Vision Development Through Edina’s Eyes Series in their blog.  Click below to see the blog and their site. CLEAR SPEECH, INC.   By Dr. Lynn Hellerstein, Colorado Optometrist in Vision Therapy, Hellerstein and Brenner Vision Center

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Many thanks to Clear Speech, Inc., a pediatric speech, language, and feeding clinic in Everett, WA.  They featured my Vision Development Through Edina’s Eyes Series in their blog.  Click below to see the blog and their site.

 

By Dr. Lynn Hellerstein, Colorado Optometrist in Vision Therapy, Hellerstein and Brenner Vision Center

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Through Edina’s Eyes – 2 years old https://lynnhellerstein.com/through-edinas-eyes-2-years-old/ https://lynnhellerstein.com/through-edinas-eyes-2-years-old/#respond Tue, 18 Sep 2012 21:44:55 +0000 https://lynnhellerstein.com/?p=3881 We continue with vision development through Edina’s eyes. Please check out previous newsletters to read the first five parts of this story. This newsletter includes the developmental time frame from 18-24 months. Happy birthday! Edina is 2 years old…no longer an infant…now a toddler! Children go through distinct periods of development as they move from […]

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We continue with vision development through Edina’s eyes.
Please check out previous newsletters to read the first five parts of this story.
This newsletter includes the developmental time frame from 18-24 months.

Happy birthday! Edina is 2 years old…no longer an infant…now a toddler!

Children go through distinct periods of development as they move from infants to toddlers to grade-schoolers to young adults. During each of these stages, multiple changes in the development of the brain take place.

When your child starts walking on his or her own, it opens up a whole new world of freedom. Exploration of the environment is your child’s mission. Language development also takes major leaps. Your child learns words which turn into sentences. The one word that they develop early on is…NO!  Your child may be able to easily say “NO”, but needs help to learn to respond to “NO” from others!

Your child’s vision continues to develop throughout the toddler years. As toddlers, it is important for them to continue development of eye/hand/body coordination, eye teaming, and depth perception. There should be no crossed or drifting eyes noted. Remember, your child should have already received their first vision assessment from a developmental optometrist!

This is a stage of rapid physical and intellectual development that prepares your child for school, which includes social interaction with peers. You, as parents, are in the position to “coach” your child, providing the right combination of support, encouragement and guidance. You are initially the primary teacher for your child to master the basic skills.

By the end of 24 months (2 years), many children are able to:

  • Have approximately 200 words in vocabulary
  • Speak in small sentences
  • Show some independence, including defiance
  • Imitate motor movements like dance, gestures, etc.
  • Run
  • Use stairs independently
  • Kick a ball
  • Build a 6 cube tower with blocks
  • Start coloring
  • “Pretend” read (look at pictures and babble-like reading)
  • Have interest in potty training

Visual Observations:

  • Good tracking skills
  • Judges distances more accurately when grasping & throwing objects (look out!)
  • Looks intently at a book as you read to your child
  • Recognizes self in photo
  • Matches simple, concrete shapes
  • Locates specific pictures in books
  • Imitates simple strokes
  • Beginning to show signs of visual memory (retrieving a toy from a place it was last seen)

Concerns:

  • Misalignment of the eyes (called strabismus) should not be present after 4-6 months.
  • Your child does not seem interested in looking at objects or people
  • Extreme sensitivity to lights
  • Excessive tearing
  • Red or encrusted eye lids
  • Lack of visual attention
  • Decreased movement or motor development
  • Lack of language

If you notice any of the concerns stated above, take your baby in for a professional eye examination from a developmental optometrist or ophthalmologist. Also discuss your concerns with your pediatrician or family doctor.

Ways to Encourage Development:

  • Baby-proof your house. Bumps, bruises, eye injuries & other serious injuries can occur as your baby begins to physically explore the environment. Keep cabinets that contain cleaning supplies or dangerous objects locked. Put barriers in front of stairwells.
  • Provide plenty of playtime, including playing alone, with peers and with their parents
  • Have plenty of SAFE objects and toys that can be pulled apart
  • Use building blocks, puzzles and balls of all shapes and sizes to play with to boost fine motor skills
  • Read or tell stories to stimulate your child’s ability to visualize and pave the way for learning and reading
  • Listen to music and play with musical toys
  • Provide tools for drawing, cutting and other artistic activities (crayons, markers, safe scissors, paint, clay, etc.)
  • Get your child outside as much as possible, even in the colder weather. Well-chosen outdoor play games can provide for plenty of fun, exploration, education and physical development.
  • With all the electronic media available (computers, tablets, TV, movies, etc.), electronic input for children of this age should be limited to no more than 2 hours per day (including educational programs).

Research shows that the key to healthy child development is the amount of time children spend time with their parents, having fun and learning at the same time.

I don’t want any parents worrying about their baby because of certain developmental “cut-off” dates. Development does not always progress in a smooth manner. All children develop at their own rate. Ask your doctor or nurse if you have concerns with the development or health of your baby.

I am blessed to be a part of my child’s and grandchild’s life. There is just no way to describe the love, fun and beautiful experiences that children bring to my life!

Feel free to send questions, comments or insights on your journey of transformation.

With love and gratitude,

Lynn Fishman Hellerstein, O.D., FCOVD, FAAO


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Vision Development: 12-18 months https://lynnhellerstein.com/vision-development-12-18-months/ https://lynnhellerstein.com/vision-development-12-18-months/#respond Mon, 16 Apr 2012 16:00:06 +0000 https://lynnhellerstein.com/?p=3564 We continue with vision development through Edina’s eyes.  Please check out previous newsletters to read the first four parts of this story. Look out!! Ready or not, here they come!  Your baby is now quite mobile, usually transitioning from crawling to walking.  Exploration is your baby’s mission!  Your child’s vision continues to develop.  It is […]

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We continue with vision development through Edina’s eyes.  Please check out previous newsletters to read the first four parts of this story.

Look out!! Ready or not, here they come!  Your baby is now quite mobile, usually transitioning from crawling to walking.  Exploration is your baby’s mission!  Your child’s vision continues to develop.  It is important for your child to continue the development of eye/hand/body coordination, eye teaming and depth perception.

This section includes the developmental time frame from 12-18 months. Remember, your child should have already received their first vision assessment from a developmental optometrist!

12-18 months

By the end of 12 months (1 year), many children are able to:

  • Use simple gestures (waving “bye-bye”)
  • Make sounds such as “ma” and “da”
  • Imitate actions in their play (clap when you clap)
  • Respond when told “no”

By the end of 18 months (1 ½ years) many children are able to:

  • Do simple pretend play (“talk” on a telephone)
  • Point to interesting objects
  • Look at an object when you point at it and tell them to “look”
  • Use several single words unprompted
  • Listen to books…often the same one over and over again!
  • “Dance” with music
  • Interested in ball play (rolling)

VISUAL OBSERVATIONS:

  • Good tracking skills
  • Judges distances more accurately when grasping & throwing objects (look out!)

OTHER DEVELOPMENTAL MILESTONES:

  • Babbling increasing, with inflection of “sentences”
  • Eye-hand coordination continues to improve
  • May be shy with strangers
  • Starting to use eating utensils
  • Explores objects in many different ways (shaking, banging, throwing, dropping).
  • Puts objects in and out of containers

For more pictures, videos and developmental milestones, click here

CONCERNS:

  • Misalignment of the eyes (called strabismus) should not be present after 4-6 months.
  • Your child does not seem interested in looking at objects or people
  • Extreme sensitivity to lights
  • Excessive tearing
  • Red or encrusted eye lids
  • White pupil

If you notice any of the concerns stated above, take your baby in for a professional eye examination from a developmental optometrist or ophthalmologist.

HOW TO ENCOURAGE DEVELOPMENT:

  • Baby-proof your house.  Bumps, bruises, eye injuries & other serious injuries can occur as your baby begins to physically explore the environment.  Keep cabinets that contain cleaning supplies or dangerous objects locked.  Put barriers in front of stairwells.
  • Roll a ball back and forth to your child
  • Provide plenty of SAFE objects and toys that can be pulled apart
  • Use building blocks and balls of all shapes and sizes to play with to boost fine motor skills
  • Read or tell stories to stimulate your child’s ability to visualize and pave the way for learning and reading

I don’t want any parents worrying about their baby because of certain developmental “cut-off” dates.  Development does not always progress in a smooth manner.  All children develop at their own rate.  Ask your doctor or nurse if you have concerns with the development or health of your baby.

I am blessed to be a part of my child’s and grandchild’s life.

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Vision Development: 7-12 months https://lynnhellerstein.com/vision-development-7-12-months/ https://lynnhellerstein.com/vision-development-7-12-months/#respond Wed, 14 Mar 2012 00:07:52 +0000 https://lynnhellerstein.com/?p=3487 We continue with vision development through Edina’s eyes.  Please check out previous newsletters to read the first three parts of this story. This section includes 6 months of developmental time from 7-12 months. Some kids are walking by 9 months and some don’t walk until 18 months. Same thing with crawling. Four to nine months […]

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We continue with vision development through Edina’s eyes.  Please check out previous newsletters to read the first three parts of this story.

This section includes 6 months of developmental time from 7-12 months. Some kids are walking by 9 months and some don’t walk until 18 months. Same thing with crawling. Four to nine months is the typical range of “normal” development for crawling. I don’t want any parents worrying about their baby because of certain developmental cut-off dates. Remember, each child develops at his or her own rate.  Ask your pediatrician if you have concerns with the development or health of your baby.

7-12 months – Let the real FUN begin!

VISUAL OBSERVATIONS:

  • Good tracking skills
  • Judges distance more accurately at grasping & throwing objects (look out!)
  • Eye color may change.  Most babies are born with blue eyes.  More dark pigment is produced in the iris, which will often change your baby’s eye color from blue to brown, green, gray or a mixture.
  • Your baby’s eyes should work together as a team.  Misalignment of the eyes (called strabismus) should not be present.  If your baby’s eyes do not seem to be straight, take him for a professional eye examination from a developmental optometrist or ophthalmologist who specializes in working with children.
  • Loves looking at self in the mirror

OTHER DEVELOPMENTAL MILESTONES:

  • Your baby is now mobile.  Crawling and scooting develop. Your baby now covers more distances.
  • Pulls self to stand.
  • Some babies start walking between 9-12 months.
  • Responds to his/her name.
  • Begins to respond to “no.”
  • Babbles chains of words.
  • Developing good eye-hand coordination. Reaches with one hand, transfers objects from hand to hand.
  • May be shy with strangers.
  • Loves imitating people.
  • May begin to be fearful in some situations.
  • Finger feeds.
  • Explores objects in many different ways (shaking, banging, throwing, dropping).
  • Uses pincer grasp.
  • Puts objects into a container.
  • Begins to use objects correctly (drinking from cup, brushing hair, listening to phone).
  • Increasing attention to speech… says “dada” and “mama.”
  • Imitates words.

For more pictures, videos and developmental milestones, click here

HOW TO ENCOURAGE DEVELOPMENT:

  • Allow your baby to get on the floor and encourage him to crawl to you or toys.
  • Provide plenty of SAFE objects and toys that can be pulled apart.
  • Baby-proof your house. Bumps, bruises, eye injuries & other serious injuries can occur as your baby begins to physically explore the environment.  Keep cabinets that contain cleaning supplies or dangerous objects locked. Put barriers in front of stairwells.

Development does not always progress in a smooth manner.  All children develop at their own rate.

I am blessed to be a part of my child’s and grandchild’s life.

April 2012 Newsletter will cover Edina’s development up to 18 months, including her trip to Puerto Vallarta, where she first discovers the beauty and mysteries of the ocean!

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Vision Development: 4-6 Months https://lynnhellerstein.com/vision-development-4-6-months/ https://lynnhellerstein.com/vision-development-4-6-months/#respond Fri, 17 Feb 2012 22:31:54 +0000 https://lynnhellerstein.com/?p=3461 Huge advances in vision development have occurred in the brain by 6 months old.  Visual acuity is now estimated to be approximately 20/25.  Color vision is normal. VISUAL OBSERVATIONS: Your baby is tracking more efficiently and for longer periods of time. Eyes are now straight and well-coordinated. Beginning to understand how to play “peek-a-boo.” Interested […]

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Huge advances in vision development have occurred in the brain by 6 months old.  Visual acuity is now estimated to be approximately 20/25.  Color vision is normal.

VISUAL OBSERVATIONS:

  • Your baby is tracking more efficiently and for longer periods of time.
  • Eyes are now straight and well-coordinated.
  • Beginning to understand how to play “peek-a-boo.”
  • Interested in mirrors.
  • Explores more with hands and mouth.

OTHER DEVELOPMENTAL MILESTONES:

  • Rolls over either direction
  • Responds to own name
  • Begins to respond to “no”
  • Babbles more like words
  • Sits with little support
  • Reaches with one hand
  • Transfers object from hand to hand
  • Supports whole weight on legs


HOW TO ENCOURAGE DEVELOPMENT:

  • Allow your baby to get on the floor and encourage him to crawl to you or toys.
  • Provide plenty of SAFE objects and toys that can be pulled apart.
  • Play peek-a-boo.
  • Talk to your baby.  Describe objects, colors, places, etc.

For earlier pictures, videos and developmental milestones, click here

If your baby’s eyes still look crossed from about 4-6 months of life, it is time to take your baby in for an eye examination with a developmental optometrist or ophthalmologist.  Sometimes you baby’s eyes might look crossed, but they really are not.  That is because your baby might have a flat nose bridge.  This creates what is called a “pseudo-strabismus.”  The nasal part of the eyelids partially cover some of the white part of the eye.  This gives the illusion of crossed eyes because you see less “white” (sclera) of your baby’s eyes.  Your eye doctor can tell for sure if your baby has crossed eyes that will require treatment, or pseudo-crossed eyes that does not require any treatment (this illusion goes away as your baby grows).

Note that American Optometric Association (AOA) has a program called Infant See ®.  Optometrists in your area will give your infant under 1 year old a FREE vision assessment.  This is a great place to start appropriate vision care for your baby.

March 2012 newsletter will take Edina up to 1 year old.  Amazing how quickly time passes!  Many thanks to my daughter and graphic designer, Annie, for capturing such special moments on film and video.

Development does not always progress in a smooth manner.  All children develop at their own rate.

Click here to continue on the vision journey, Vision Development through Edina’s Eyes.

I am blessed to be a part of my child’s and grandchild’s life.

 

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Vision Development: 2-4 Months https://lynnhellerstein.com/vision-development-2-4-months/ https://lynnhellerstein.com/vision-development-2-4-months/#comments Wed, 12 Oct 2011 13:21:56 +0000 https://lynnhellerstein.com/?p=2979 Visual skills are learned through a developmental sequence of movement and processing skills, starting in infancy (and before). Your infant’s and toddler’s development has tremendous impact on his performance and abilities in his school years to follow. Huge advances in vision development take place. Sharper visual acuity (details) and improved eye coordination occurs. OBSERVATIONS: Your […]

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Visual skills are learned through a developmental sequence of movement and processing skills, starting in infancy (and before). Your infant’s and toddler’s development has tremendous impact on his performance and abilities in his school years to follow.

Huge advances in vision development take place. Sharper visual acuity (details) and improved eye coordination occurs.

OBSERVATIONS:

  • Your baby starts tracking your face and other objects more consistently
  • Shifts gaze from one object to another without having to move their head
  • Light sensitivity may be apparent
  • Eyes may cross or wander, but not as frequent
  • Begins to grasp for toys and objects

OTHER DEVELOPMENTAL MILESTONES:

  • Begins to babble
  • Imitates some sounds
  • Brings hands to mouth
  • Turns head to the direction of the sound
  • Sits up with support
  • May start rolling over

HOW TO ENCOURAGE DEVELOPMENT:

  • Add new items to their room or change the location/direction of their crib.
  • Talk to your baby as you walk around the room.
  • Put your baby on his stomach when he is awake for “tummy time.” This helps your baby develop better neck and visual control.
  • Sending kids to school with vision problems is like going to work without the primary resources that you need for your job. Developmental visual skills are an essential part of school readiness.

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Vision Development: Birth – 2 months https://lynnhellerstein.com/vision-development-birth-2-months/ https://lynnhellerstein.com/vision-development-birth-2-months/#comments Tue, 06 Sep 2011 15:37:57 +0000 https://lynnhellerstein.com/?p=2917 OBSERVATIONS: Babies often don’t focus on you or other targets, as nerve cells in their retina and brain are not fully developed. The infant cannot accommodate (focus on near objects) very well. However, within a few days after birth, infants prefer looking at an image of their mother’s face to that of a stranger.  Visual acuity […]

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OBSERVATIONS:

Babies often don’t focus on you or other targets, as nerve cells in their retina and brain are not fully developed. The infant cannot accommodate (focus on near objects) very well. However, within a few days after birth, infants prefer looking at an image of their mother’s face to that of a stranger.  Visual acuity is estimated to be approximately 20/400.

Your child’s eyes may look huge!  Your baby’s eyes are approximately 65% of their adult size.  They “grow into” their large eyes, as the head develops over time.

Eyes may cross or drift.  This is normal (as seen in this picture of Edina at one month).

At one week after birth, they can see red, orange, yellow and green.  It takes longer for them to see blue and violet.

WHAT TO LOOK FOR:

  • Begins to develop a smile
  • Begins to imitate some facial expressions
  • Watches faces intently
  • Begins to follow moving objects

OTHER DEVELOPMENTAL MILESTONES:

  • Stretches legs out and kicks
  • Opens and shuts hands
  • Holds head with little support
  • Pushes down on legs when feet are placed on a firm surface (no, the baby is NOT ready to walk yet!)
  • Responds to loud noises
  • Finds hands
  • Should be able to move eyes in all directions of gaze

HOW TO ENCOURAGE DEVELOPMENT:

  • Frequent interactions (visual, speech, movement) with your newborn child.
  • It’s ok to leave some lights on in the nursery- it won’t affect your baby’s ability to sleep (and keeps you from bumping into things when you wake up in the middle of the night!)
  • Start talking and singing to your child immediately.
  • Decorate your child’s room with bright, cheerful colors.  Include artwork and furnishings with contrasting colors and shapes.  Hang a brightly colored mobile above or near the crib.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE ABOUT VISION DEVELOPMENT THROUGH EDINA’S EYES

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